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Resource of the Month – How to Master Your Time – Save $20 plus Free Shipping
by On July 8, 2009

List Price $79 ~ Your Price $59 plus Free Shipping 
>>>
Order Now! <<<
Order by phone 888-233-0407
Offer good through July 31, 2009

Those who get more done in less time get more out of life . . . more rewards, more success, and more free time to pursue their dreams and enjoy themselves.In fact, you’ll discover from success expert Brian Tracy, that “the quality of your life is largely determined by the quality of your time management.”

You don’t have to be cold and calculating to be well organized. Time mastery does not mean letting the clock rule your life. In fact, the very opposite is true: time mastery gives you the absolute freedom to do what you want, when you want to do it. Ironically, you even learn to make time for spontaneity. The more time you make for yourself, the more free time you’ll have.

Through listening to these CDs, you will learn:

–  7 of the most common time wasters
–  5 ways to handle telephone interruptions 
–  6 ways to improve your concentration
–  9 proven methods for boosting your productivity
–  10 steps for managing complex projects
–  5 things you must do when beginning a new task
–  16 methods for overcoming procrastination
–  14 ways to stay ahead of the pack
–  7 time waster when working on a team
–  7 ways to get more done in the same amount of time
–  6 step process for solving problems fast
–  10 of the biggest time wasters when selling
–  7 ways to increase your sales effectiveness
–  How to delegate more effectively and become more adept at prioritizing
–  How to manage meetings effectively
–  Learn to lead others as an example of successful time management
–  Become results-oriented, working smarter, not harder
–  Use positive self-talk and affirmations to change your self-conceptions about time
–  Visualize efficiency and excellence using mental rehearsal techniques
–  Model your own behavior after the most efficient people you know
–  Energize yourself with the positive results of your labor

You’ll make a decision to become excellent at time management . . . to concentrate on the highest pay-off tasks. Your life will simply begin to work better.

Unlike many programs on time management, How to Master Your Time has no charts, no forms, no daily schedules. Tracy believes in them but knows you are quite capable of developing them for yourself. His purpose in this program is to teach you the philosophy of time management, to help you internalize it, and to help you develop a belief system that will make your every moment more efficient.

As Brian Tracy puts it:
“This program is the result of 20 years of experience-of research and teaching with more than 200 corporations. I designed this program to give you everything you will ever need to know about mastering your time for your personal life and career.”

By becoming a master of your time, you’ll greatly improve the sense of control you have and in turn improve your well-being in every aspect of your life.

Remember, time is your most precious and perishable asset. You can begin investing it more wisely by listening to these tapes and putting their wisdom to use. Start today!

6 CDs

List Price $79 ~ Your Price $59

>>> Order Now! <<<

Order by phone 888-233-0407

Offer good through July 31, 2009

Swallowing the Bullfrog
by On July 6, 2009

I recently received this email from a contact of mine, and a few of his tips really stung. I know I’m guilty of not following these priorities all the time, and I know not doing it doesn’t serve me. I thought I’d pass it on-maybe you’ll get a bit stung, too, but it’s good for you!

A friend and I were talking recently about time management and prioritization. I told him that for me, the key to getting things done is to know the single most important thing I must do that day and to do it first. That way, it is impossible to get to the end of the day and say, “I did not get anything done.”

My friend looked at me and said, “That’s called swallowing the bullfrog.”

“Excuse me?” I said.

He went on to explain. “Swallowing the bullfrog means you have a hamburger on your plate, some fries, and a bullfrog. You are required to eat everything on your plate. What do you eat first? The bullfrog, of course, so that you can get it out of the way.”

Performance Principle:
Swallowing the bullfrog means doing the important things first even if they are not enjoyable. In business you have to prioritize completing tasks that are not fun in order to get ahead. That means:

  1. Before you respond to your email, follow up with prospects that have not gotten back to you yet. Your email will still be there when you are done.
  2. Before you spend more time on that deal that is about to close, invest an hour in setting up appointments with brand new prospects. Your current deal will close – but you will only have new deals to work on if you prospect now.
  3. Before you spend an hour completing your expense report, spend an hour researching the executives of the company you are meeting with next week. Your productivity next week depends on your preparation this week.
  4. Before you do anything else, call that customer who has a complaint or problem and get it worked out. In the end, everything we do is focused on creating a great customer experience.
  5. Before you get involved in administrivia on your desk, follow up again with that prospect you met with two weeks ago. Don’t wait for prospects to become clients. Ask them to move to the next step with you or move onto other prospects.

The key to time management is to know your priorities and to address them first. If you keep that in mind, and are willing to “swallow the bullfrog” every day, you will get great results.

Copyright 2008, Eric Herrenkohl, Herrenkohl Consulting. All rights reserved.

Be Free!

Leah Simpson
Instructor

PS – Don’t forget to enter our Time Managment Contest – you could win 3 hours of one-on-one time managment coaching!

Time Management Contest – Answer 1 Question and Win 3 Sessions of Personal Coaching
by On July 2, 2009

Face it, life is hectic. With juggling a professional career, meetings, family obligations, appointments, your kids’ extra curricular activities, trying to live healthy, keeping up-to-date with current with current affairs, we hardly have time to sleep!For this month’s contest, we want to know your advice on how to effectively manage your time.

To enter, simply type you name, email and your answer to this question:

If you were coaching an individual on time management, in your opinion, what is the one concept that they should absolutely know?

Winners will be based on how concise their answer is, applicability and quality of advice.

Prizes:

Grand Prize – Three sessions of free, one-on-one, personal coaching on Time Management with me, Leah Simpson.

The winner and I will have a conversation about the specific topic and goal they would like to achieve during the coaching sessions. Topics to choose from include:

o  How to add an additional 10 productive hours to your week – every week
o  An easy way to identify your priorities, and make time for all of them
o  7-step formula for creating an effective schedule based on your priorities
o  10 tips to increase efficiency and power-up productivity
o  The 2 most important time management questions you need to answer
o  How to effectively deal with interruptions during the day
o  How to schedule time for fun
o  What your short and long term goals are and where to find time to accomplish them

Coaching sessions will be done over the phone. This prize is valued at $1,500.

Second Place
“Expect Success” Book
Third PlaceFreedom Personal Development Water Bottle

All winners will also get a “Be Free” Sticker and a Personal Development Blue Light-up Pen!

Winners will be chosen by myself and members of the Freedom Personal Development team and will be emailed and announced on the blog August 3, 2009.

Deadline to enter is July 31, 2009.

Be Free!

Leah Simpson
Instructor and Coach

Video – Tim Ferris with 3 Tips on How to Have a 4-Hour Workweek
by On June 19, 2009

Tim Ferris, author of the book, “The 4-Hour Workweek” says you can work a lot less and enjoy life more.

In this video, he Tim outlines 3 tips on how to escape the 9-to-5 grind and work just four hours a week.

The tips include:

1.  The Process of Elimination
How to identify the 20% of your activities, customers and people you work with that produce 80% of your desired outcomes.

2.  Start a Low Information Diet
How to handle email interruptions to better manage your time to accomplish your most important objectives.

3.  Outsourcing Your Life
How much is your time worth?  Tim explains a step-by-step process to calculate ROI by hour and how you can hire a personal assistant for only $5 per hour.

Can You Afford Patience
by On March 16, 2009

You have heard the cliché, “Rome was not built in a day” many times and you have been told countless times that, “Patience is a virtue.”  My question to you is, Can we afford patience in today’s world?  Don’t we have to keep up? Technology is changing exponentially, it doubles every 18 month.  Do we have time to be patient?

In my humble opinion, we cannot afford not  to learn more patience. Think about all the things in this world that show greatness, things that are awe inspiring and think about the patience required to create them.

Look at the nature. It takes a sequoia tree hundreds of years to reach its height. The Grand Canyon has taken hundred of thousands of years to achieve it grandness.  Beaches did not start with sand. Wave must pound the rocks on the shore from millennia to create the sand that lines our coast, and mountains do not spring up overnight. The point of these examples is that greatness takes time. Greatness cannot be force.

The good news is that it will not take you millennia to become great. It will not even take you a hundred years to become great, but  you must remember it will not happen over night. As you are to become a great entrepreneur, sales manager, a sale person, teacher, wife, husband, parent, artist, whatever. It will require patience. It will also require hard work.

Brian Tracy taught me a lesson a while ago that many of you heard me say at our memory training workshop. “Anything that is worth doing is worth doing poorly at first.”

If you are going to learn any new skill, it will require patience especially in the beginning. For example, learning to play the piano. If learning this skill was important to you, would it be okay if you made mistakes and were off key in the would it be ok?  Of course it would. It would be expected, you would hit the wrong keys or you would misread the notes at times. You could not expect to play Beethoven when you sat down the first time. Patience would be required to get to that point to be able to play Beethoven.

Sales can be like playing the piano. There are million of little things that add up to a wonderful work of art in the end, and you must be patient with your learning curve and the work to create that beautiful music of a sale.

Having patience with yourself as you learn new skills, as you try new things, is the only way to be a success in the end.  Remember, you can afford patience to attain greatness.

Be Free!

Tom Weber
VP of Sales

Work Hard or Work Smart
by On January 21, 2009

You have heard your whole life that you should work really hard to get ahead in life or to achieve success. And most likely, you have also heard people talking about working smart to achieve their success.

So, the question becomes “Well, which one is it?” Because you’ve seen people put their heads down, keep their nose to the grindstone for 25 years, and work really really HARD, to end up not far from where they started. Conversely, you’ve also seen that guy in your office who continually is trying to work smart. He is always looking for a shortcut, scheming to find an easier way, looking for the magic bullet, spinning his wheels, and spending more energy on how to “work smart” than if he just went ahead and got busy.

The answer to the question, if you haven’t figured it out already, becomes simple. It is to work both hard and smart. This may sound overly simplistic, but how often do we consciously pick the times that we are going to work smart or hard? How often do we look into the mirror and think about our strategy for the day? For the week? For the month?

I could get cute and give this concept a name like “Hart Worker” or “Smard Worker” but I’m not going to because you deserve better.

This is what you need in order to start your year strong. Start with the work smart part, here’s how.

Take an evaluation of your situation, a good hard look at what you are working with, where are you in relation to your goals, and what would it take to hit those. Play with the numbers, get a plan of attack, a game plan and a schedule of when you will be working hard.

Working Smart = Making a Plan

Then, work your tail off. Work harder than you thought possible. You have way more in you than you can imagine. You are stronger than you think you are, you are more creative than you believe yourself to be, you are infinitely more powerful than you believe you are and you can reach that summit.

Working Hard = Working the Plan

But be careful, don’t forget to keep the smart part of the equation. Before your week starts or your day starts, get an assessment, get your plan in order, and then get after it again.

And just so we’re clear, this goal can be applied to any area of your life: a sales goal, a grade in a class, a better marriage, a stronger relationship with a child or parent, or a health goal.

How do you work smart?

Work smart, work hard and live strong.

Be Free!

Tom Weber
VP of Sales

Work Hard, Play Hard – It is a Myth
by On January 20, 2009

This article was found on the Organize IT Blog

Working hard and playing hard is a very popular saying nowadays. Actually to many people it’s more than a saying, it’s a way of life.

Because we spend so much time working it’s only natural that we should find an equally demanding form of release that we can fit into the little time we have left for ourselves. What better way to play hard than to go out on a weekend, down copious amounts of alcohol, and eventually stagger home at 6AM?

The problem with working hard is it’s a surefire way to burn out and the problem with playing hard is… it’s also a surefire way to burn out. You see the problem?

Businesses don’t exactly help the situation. They continue to force more stupid work hours, leaving us with less free time to fit in all the stress-releasing fun we need as a result. In fact, in the near future (if it’s not happening already) companies will probably have offices on one floor and bars and clubs on another so their employees will never need to leave the building on a weekend. I’m waiting for the time when companies start asking why work and play need to be separate things (because work is so much fun, right?). If you find yourself dancing away with a Smirnoff Ice in your hand while simultaneously analyzing the latest sales figures with your team you’ll know things have gone too far.

The whole work hard, play hard mantra unfortunately shows no sign of stopping even though it’s quite frankly a marketing con.

How hard must you really be working if you still have the time and energy to go partying afterwards? And how heavily must you be playing if you are still able to do a demanding day at work without much sleep and probably an hangover?

But what can we do? Well why would you even want to work hard for the sake of it? Try working smart and playing smart instead. Rather than spending all your time knee-deep in work, look at how to streamline your workflow, become more productive and use your time better. That way you won’t feel pressured to find quick-fix ways of having a good time.

http://www.organizeit.co.uk/2009/01/12/self-help-myths-work-hard-play-hard/
*************************************
In tomorrow’s blog post, Tom Weber will discuss the differences between working hard and working smart.

The Two Most Important Time Management Questions
by On January 15, 2009

Have you ever found yourself thinking about work when you were supposed to be enjoying time with your family… or thinking about your plans for the evening during your work day?  Nearly every day, I hear someone tell me they wished there were more hours in the day or that they feel overwhelmed with too many things happening at once.

 There are two questions, if you get in the habit of asking yourself and then give yourself an honest answer, that can immediately help you become more effective.

  1. “Is what I am doing right now moving me closer to my goals?” 
    By stopping and asking yourself that simple question, you will quickly be able to identify whether or not you are working in the right area or just wasting your time.  And if you are wasting your time on something not important to you, STOP IMMEDIATELY and move on to something meaningful.
  2. “Is what I am doing RIGHT NOW the most valuable use of my time?” 
    By focusing on what is truly the most valuable use of your time, you will avoid spending extra time and effort keeping yourself busy rather than being productive.  The behavior that I most commonly observe in people who are feeling overwhelmed is that they are confusing ACTIVITY with ACCOMPLISHMENT.

Many of our students have commented that by forming the habit of asking these two questions, they not only find themselves accomplishing more than they did in the past, they often find that they are doing more in LESS time.

You cannot manage time, but you can certainly manage your focus.  I look forward to hearing YOUR success stories as you begin asking yourself the two most important time management questions.

Be Free!

Eric Plantenberg
President

Scheduling New Year
by On December 29, 2008

With 2009 right around the corner, many of you are starting to set resolutions or goals for the New Year. You probably have a long list of things you want to accomplish. Perhaps getting to the gym three times a week, taking a two week vacation, setting and sticking to a weekly budget, learn a new hobby, cooking and eating healthier each night for dinner, but you might be thinking to yourself, “Do I really have the time to make these resolutions a reality?”

We all know people, who seem to do everything, but how do they fit it in with work, family and other commitments? Did this just happen? Are they lucky? No, they are intentional with their long term planning.

For example, gold medal Olympians do not just wake up one day able to do best in the world. Lance Armstrong does not just happen to be a great cyclist and also have the time to start a Cancer foundation. John Coltrane did not just pick up a saxophone and sounds like a jazz legend. Successful people worked at their trade and they plan their development with diligence.

Maybe you do not desire to be a star athlete or rock star, but you would like to be in better shape, to be able to play a tune or two on a guitar. You have to start with the same approach, develop a plan to make your wish a reality.

The most effective way to turn a New Year’s resolution into a reality is to create a goal around that wish. Most people live only with dreams and wishes, which is a good thing …but it is very different from goals. In fact, 99% of people do not know how to set an effective goal. For us to make sure you are in the case of 1%. There are five characteristics of a goal:

  1. Your goal must be something that is important to you. This sounds so obvious, but many times our goals are created by others, our boss, a friend, resolves the child, but not you, so make sure your goal is truly your own goal.
  2. Your goal must be the right bet. You may want to run more but if you have not jog for the last year, it is probably not the right size goal to say that you want to be a world champion marathon runner by the end of this year. Your goal maybe a reach for you, but not completely not unrealistic.
  3. Your goal must be specific and measurable. Loosing weight is not specific or measurable. Loosing five pounds or thirty pounds by December 31, 2009 is specific and measurable. You need to be able to measure if you have met your goal or not. Loosing ten pounds by a 30-years high school reunion on September 28, 2009 is specific and measurable.
  4. Your goal must be written down. You cannot just think something in your head and call it a goal. Write it down and when you do, youown it.
  5. Your goal must be reviewed, look over your goal, put it in front of you. Review your goals; otherwise, it does not count as a goal.

So, for example, if one of you resolutions is to read more, you can turn that desire into a goal. “I will read ten books by the end of this school year, June 15, 2009.” Now, of course, only you would know if that is important to you and the right size for you, but it is definitely specific and measurable, just be sure to write it down and review it and it is a goal.

Now, that you have turned your desire into goal, the next step is to design a pathway to achieve that goal. To determine your pathway, your proactive steps in achieving long-term plan, you needed two things:

  1. Decide how much time it will take you to achieve your goal.
  2. Schedule that time into your weekly plan.

For example, your ten-book goal means that you should average one book for month. You may say to read one book a month will take me 8 hours. Therefore, you need to include two reading hours per week into your weekly schedule. Plan this out into your schedule; just like you would a doctor’s appointment and you will be soon on your own way to seeing your hopes, and New Year’s resolutions become reality. The ability to turn wishes into reality is a powerful thing, enjoy, and dream big.

Be Free!

Leah Simpson
Instructor

Scheduling New Year
by On December 29, 2008

With 2009 right around the corner, many of you are starting to set resolutions or goals for the New Year. You probably have a long list of things you want to accomplish. Perhaps getting to the gym three times a week, taking a two week vacation, setting and sticking to a weekly budget, learn a new hobby, cooking and eating healthier each night for dinner, but you might be thinking to yourself, “Do I really have the time to make these resolutions a reality?”

We all know people, who seem to do everything, but how do they fit it in with work, family and other commitments? Did this just happen? Are they lucky? No, they are intentional with their long term planning.

For example, gold medal Olympians do not just wake up one day able to do best in the world. Lance Armstrong does not just happen to be a great cyclist and also have the time to start a Cancer foundation. John Coltrane did not just pick up a saxophone and sounds like a jazz legend. Successful people worked at their trade and they plan their development with diligence.

Maybe you do not desire to be a star athlete or rock star, but you would like to be in better shape, to be able to play a tune or two on a guitar. You have to start with the same approach, develop a plan to make your wish a reality.

The most effective way to turn a New Year’s resolution into a reality is to create a goal around that wish. Most people live only with dreams and wishes, which is a good thing …but it is very different from goals. In fact, 99% of people do not know how to set an effective goal. For us to make sure you are in the case of 1%. There are five characteristics of a goal:

  1. Your goal must be something that is important to you. This sounds so obvious, but many times our goals are created by others, our boss, a friend, resolves the child, but not you, so make sure your goal is truly your own goal.
  2. Your goal must be the right bet. You may want to run more but if you have not jog for the last year, it is probably not the right size goal to say that you want to be a world champion marathon runner by the end of this year. Your goal maybe a reach for you, but not completely not unrealistic.
  3. Your goal must be specific and measurable. Loosing weight is not specific or measurable. Loosing five pounds or thirty pounds by December 31, 2009 is specific and measurable. You need to be able to measure if you have met your goal or not. Loosing ten pounds by a 30-years high school reunion on September 28, 2009 is specific and measurable.
  4. Your goal must be written down. You cannot just think something in your head and call it a goal. Write it down and when you do, youown it.
  5. Your goal must be reviewed, look over your goal, put it in front of you. Review your goals; otherwise, it does not count as a goal.

So, for example, if one of you resolutions is to read more, you can turn that desire into a goal. “I will read ten books by the end of this school year, June 15, 2009.” Now, of course, only you would know if that is important to you and the right size for you, but it is definitely specific and measurable, just be sure to write it down and review it and it is a goal.

Now, that you have turned your desire into goal, the next step is to design a pathway to achieve that goal. To determine your pathway, your proactive steps in achieving long-term plan, you needed two things:

  1. Decide how much time it will take you to achieve your goal.
  2. Schedule that time into your weekly plan.

For example, your ten-book goal means that you should average one book for month. You may say to read one book a month will take me 8 hours. Therefore, you need to include two reading hours per week into your weekly schedule. Plan this out into your schedule; just like you would a doctor’s appointment and you will be soon on your own way to seeing your hopes, and New Year’s resolutions become reality. The ability to turn wishes into reality is a powerful thing, enjoy, and dream big.

Be Free!

Leah Simpson
Instructor