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Two Tips for Asking for Referrals
by On May 30, 2008

David DenisAsking for referrals is a fundamental selling tactic. But it the reason given most often on why people don’t get referrals, they simply don’t ask.

Without new prospects to convert into customers, your business cannot survive. When you gain new prospects through referrals you will find that those prospects are both easier to work with, and tend to be more profitable.

The key to getting referrals is to ask.

1. The Direct Method

You simply ask your contact, directly, “Who do you know that would benefit from my product, and would appreciate the kind of service I provide?” You can prime the pump by making suggestions like, “Who do you know in your professional organizations, or in other divisions in your company? Who do you know in your church or your social club?” Giving specific groups to consider, help provide focus makes thinking of a referral easier.

The direct approach works best right after you have closed a sale. Your clients are happy, you are happy, everybody is happy, and they are often more than willing to help you out if you ask.

2. The Indirect Method

The second method utilizes the “Give to Get” principle. It comes from Bob Burg in his book Endless Referrals. When you meet someone new, focus on learning about his business and his or her life. Once trust is established, then ask, “How do I know if someone is a good prospect for you?” Listen carefully to the answer. If you know of a good referral offer it to them immediately. Otherwise, get their card and keep your eyes and ears open for them. When you find one, call them.

By ADDDING value, you immediately set yourself apart from the herd. This is huge and it will come back to you. You can use this tactic to develop profitable win/win relationships with nearly every person you meet.

For more ideas and tips for generating referrals, get the book Endless Referrals, by Bob Burg.

What kind of questions do you ask your clients to generate referrals?

Be Free!

This article was written by David Denis owner of http://www.rocksolidwriting.com

David is a freelance writer for hire offering article writing, sales letters, training manuals, speech writing, seo content, sales writing, blog articles, copy-writing service, sales scripts and business name ideas.

To learn more, or request a quote visit http://www.rocksolidwriting.com/freelance-writer-quote

2 Ways to Boost Your Self-Esteem and Build a Positive Mental Attitude Immediately
by On May 29, 2008

Roger SeipNo matter what your profession, building self-esteem and confidence in yourself is the key to success business interactions. All things being equal, the higher your conviction in yourself, the higher your results will be.

So, how do you build your own positive mental attitude, self-esteem and confidence? More importantly, how can you build it immediately and start using it to your advantage today?

I am going to borrow this material from Stephen Covey in his great book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. In it he talks about two ways that I found very useful to build self-esteem for an individual.

Stephen Covey says that, “If you want to start building your self-esteem powerfully, profoundly, and immediately there is two very easy ways of doing it.”

1. You can set a goal and achieve it.
2. You can make a promise and keep it.

Think about that for just a second. Set a goal and achieve it; make a promise and keep it. They are almost the same thing but it is amazing how you can start implementing that on a daily basis.

I really want you to think about this. Have you ever been in the situation where you just felt more confident about yourself and what happen to your results in that situation? Your results went up and got better, did they not?

And then when your result got better, what happened? Your confidence in yourself went up and as a result of your confidence going up your result got better and the result of that. You see where I am going with this.

How do you start that upward spiral of growth today? It is those two things, set a goal and achieve it and make a promise and keep it.

So starting right now, think of one goal that you can set for today or tomorrow and then I want you to go out and achieve it. I want you to make a promise to yourself or to somebody else that you know you can keep and keep it.

These goals and promises can be simple things. Set a goal to go to the gym for an hour and then DO IT. Commit to reading 15 minutes of positive material and then MAKE IT HAPPEN. Tell your spouse you are going to do the laundry and then FOLLOW THROUGH. Say you are going to wake up at 6 am and then DO IT, don’t hit the snooze. Tell your boss or co-worker you will deliver a report to him or her by 3 pm and then KEEP YOU WORD.

Try it once to see how much better you feel at the end of the day. Keep tract of these things. Do those two things on a regular basis and it will become a habit for you.

Making promises and keeping them, setting goals and achieving them. Simple ideas, but watch how quickly your self-esteem goes up. When that happens, you will be amazed at the goodness that you attract into your life.

I’d love to hear your results of implementing these two tips. Post a comment below.

Be Free!

Roger Seip
Instructor

Memory Training Shown to Turn Up Brainpower – NY Times
by On May 28, 2008

m.gifA recent article in the New York Times reported that training your memory, specifically your working memory, leads to increased brainpower.

Read the article from the New York Times

Are you looking to increase your brainpower?
Enroll in the Memory Training Workshop.

Memory Training Shown to Turn Up Brainpower
Source: New York Times, Health, May 29, 2008
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/29/health/research/29brai.html

A new study has found that it may be possible to train people to be more intelligent, increasing the brainpower they had at birth.

Until now, it had been widely assumed that the kind of mental ability that allows us to solve new problems without having any relevant previous experience – what psychologists call fluid intelligence – is innate and cannot be taught (though people can raise their grades on tests of it by practicing).

But in the new study, researchers describe a method for improving this skill, along with experiments to prove it works.

The key, researchers found, was carefully structured training in working memory – the kind that allows memorization of a telephone number just long enough to dial it. This type of memory is closely related to fluid intelligence, according to background information in the article, and appears to rely on the same brain circuitry. So the researchers reasoned that improving it might lead to improvements in fluid intelligence.

First they measured the fluid intelligence of four groups of volunteers using standard tests. Then they trained each in a complicated memory task, an elaborate variation on Concentration, the child’s card game, in which they memorized simultaneously presented auditory and visual stimuli that they had to recall later.

The game was set up so that as the participants succeeded, the tasks became harder, and as they failed, the tasks became easier. This assured a high level of difficulty, adjusted individually for each participant, but not so high as to destroy motivation to keep working. The four groups underwent a half-hour of training daily for 8, 12, 17 and 19 days, respectively. At the end of each training, researchers tested the participants’ fluid intelligence again. To make sure they were not just improving their test-taking skills, the researchers compared them with control groups that took the tests without the training.

The results, published Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, were striking. Although the control groups also made gains, presumably because they had practice with the fluid intelligence tests, improvement in the trained groups was substantially greater. Moreover, the longer they trained, the higher their scores were. All performers, from the weakest to the strongest, showed significant improvement.

“Intelligence has always been considered principally an immutable inherited trait,” said Susanne M. Jaeggi, a postdoctoral fellow in psychology at the University of Michigan and a co-author of the paper. “Our results show you can increase your intelligence with appropriate training.”

Why did the training work? The authors suggest several aspects of the exercise relevant to solving new problems: ignoring irrelevant items, monitoring ongoing performance, managing two tasks simultaneously and connecting related items to one another in space and time.

No one knows how long the gains will last after training stops, Dr. Jaeggi said, and the experiment’s design did not allow the researchers to determine whether more training would continue to produce further gains.

Best Memory Training Story Winners
by On May 27, 2008

Tom WeberThank you to everyone who entered our contest for the best Memory Training story. If you ever wondered how life changing the Memory Training Workshop can be, be sure to read the submissions we received. And now, the moment you have all been waiting for, the Winners!!

1st Place – David – Winner a Freedom Personal Development Water Bottle and our wildly popular light-up pen.
Being able to “own” your presentation versus just “knowing” your presentation allows you to be expressive. Awesome work to you and your daughter Dave. Keep it up!

2nd Place – Kay Sanders – Winner of an “Expect Success” book.
Congrats on becoming a thespian Kay! Can we get some tickets to the next show?

3rd Place – Douglas Alexander – Winner of a super cool blue light-up pen.
I love this application Douglas. Talk about the ultimate multi-tasker!!!

Congratulations to the winners. We will be contacting you via email for the address you want your prize shipped to.

Watch our newsletter for exciting contests and prizes in the next few weeks. If you aren’t already a subscriber, join today.

Be Free!

Tom Weber
Instructor

You Know it is Going to Be a Great Day When….
by On May 23, 2008

When you wake up in the morning, do you know if it is going to be a great day? If you ever look our your window and see this, you know it is going to be a GREAT DAY!

GreatDay

Have a great Memorial Day Weekend everyone!

Be Free!

The Freedom Team

PS: If you have any fun pictures like this, email us and we will post them on our blog!
Send pictures to info@deliverfreedom.com

Treating Co-Workers Like Your Best Client
by On May 21, 2008

jodi1What if you were paid not by your own performance, but by how well and how diligently you encouraged and treated your co-workers? This doesn’t automatically sound like something we’d enjoy doing or even thinking about, but doing so will make you look at your life and your business in a powerful new way.

When you treat your co-workers with the respect of your best clients, you’re building a relationship that serves everyone. It builds unity within your organization, creating that well-oiled machine everyone wants to be part of. In The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey uses the metaphor of the Emotional Bank Account to describe “the amount of trust that’s been built up in a relationship.” That trust is built on expressed appreciation and respect.

It’s challenging to do this because we’re not robots who think and act the same way. Everyone has a different view of deadlines, how to handle stress, how to manage their time, and so on. We’re different from each other. Learn to view the differences as a good thing. For instance, no two voices on this planet are identical. Consider the TV commercials where we don’t see the celebrities, but we hear their voices. You instantly recognize them.

If everyone, or even a few, knew your specific accomplishments and challenges on a regular basis and gave the appropriate encouragement, you’d feel appreciated and understood — “instantly recognized”. Instead of just expecting everyone to start doing that for you, spend a few minutes thinking about how well you know what your co-workers are doing, what projects they’re working on, what their successes and challenges might be. Based on that information, see if you’re treating them like your best client. Then, take the following steps:

  1. View Everyone as a Team Member
    It really doesn’t matter what their position is, they ARE part of the team. Treat them that way. Ralph Waldo Emerson once said “Every man I meet is my superior in some way. In that, I learn of him.” Really talk to and especially listen to your co-workers so you can be specific and encouraging when you respond. If you don’t understand what they’re saying, ask for clarification. This may take practice, but keep trying.
  2. Always be Sincere and Respectful
    Within the concept of treating co-workers like your best client, your job is to make them look good and succeed. Don’t be afraid to give them the credit they deserve. Our clients know when we’re sincere and so do our co-workers.
  3. Preface Concerns and Counsel with Something Positive
    This is a great atmosphere in which to practice tact. If you’re willing to look, you will find something positive about every co-worker, just as you do with your best client. Start looking. When issues come up (and they will), find a way to apply the counsel given over 4,000 years ago by King Akhtoi of Egypt to his son: “Be diplomatic. It will help you gain your point.”

When you practice treating co-workers as your best client, who wins? Everyone! You’ve contributed to an atmosphere that builds confidence in others’ abilities. Those same individual contributions translate to a stronger company, more capable of adapting to changes in today’s economy and environment. You and everyone else can come to work feeling inspired and looking for success. It increases performance and directly affects the company’s bottom line. And finally, as the old adage says “What goes around comes around.”

Treat your co-workers like your best client and see how well you get paid.

Be Free!

Jodi Borden
Training Coordinator

Willowbrook, IL Memory Training Follow-Up
by On May 20, 2008

Tom WeberIt has been about a week since the Willowbrook, IL workshop and I hope all of the graduates are using their new skills to build your memory into a giant muscle!

As we discussed, to take any skill to the next level, the unconscious competence level, it will take practice. The good news is you are already equipped with the tools to assist you in turning your memory training into an unconscious habit. I have two pieces of encouragement regarding these tools:

  1. Doing the 21-Day Follow-Up in your Maximum Performance Memory System workbooks is vital. If you haven’t begun that yet, get going today!! The five to ten minutes a day you spend practicing will pay dividends in the long run.
  2. Your Maximum Performance Memory System CD should be your other main resource at this point. Make sure to listen to it once and then do the exercises one or two at a time.

Not very complicated, but if you use the tools you have been given, your skill with them will improve dramatically and rapidly. I look forward to hearing your success stories! Please post them below. I’ve already received some great feedback:

Reviews from Graduates

“Hands down the best workshop of any type I have ever attended. So much that I can use immediately! Super! I was amazed how good my memory really was! I just didn’t realize that I could retrieve information so easily! WOW!”
– Matthew Brashinger III, NAIFA
**********
“The workshop was great! Tom’s presentation, with the humor added in, made the time fly by and made a memorable experience. Well worth the investment. I will use this not only at work, but home as well.”
– Bob Bertog, President, Bertog Landscape Company
**********
“I sell real estate and feel this training will serve me very well in my profession…Follow-up materials are essential in making this course last and putting methods into practice (use).”
– Sharon McDonald, REALTOR®, RE/MAX 100
**********
If you have any questions regarding the applications of memory training, post them below and I will answer them as soon as possible.

Be Free!

Tom Weber
Instructor

What Would You Do if You Weren
by On May 19, 2008

Leah SimpsonWhat would you do it you weren’t afraid? It’s such an interesting question. So many times, we’re held back by fear.

In fact, I was just looking up phobias. Do you know that there are 98 phobias of things that start with just the letter “S”? And this isn’t even an official website. There were probably many that were missed on this list but I’ll give you a couple of my favorite “S” phobias.

The fear of string – I believe it’s pronounced li-no-no-pho-bia.

The fear of slime – (Oh, by the way, the fear of slime has two names) – blennophobia or myxophobia, whichever your preference.

Where do these fears come from and more importantly, what would be do if weren’t afraid? Think about it. A fear holds you back from doing something. So where there is fear, there is opportunity.

I’ve heard two speakers recently, talk about fears that they had in their life and the way that they confronted them. They didn’t do it in a small way.

I heard one gentleman speaking about being afraid of roller coasters and so going and riding the same rollercoaster five times every summer until his fear was gone and now he loves it.

A good friend of mine was recently speaking and he was talking about of fear of losing control. He liked to be in control of everything so he decided to bungee jump, to do something proactive once a year that he was completely out of control.

Now, for everybody, having such a dramatic confrontation of their fear is not necessarily something that will happen. So I’m going to give you three steps to take advantage of the opportunity where you find fear.

1. Identify the Fear

When there’s something that you are wondering why you are not doing it, or there’s something that you’re curious about but you’re just not taking steps forward, most of the times it’s just a fear. Identify what the fear is, what are you afraid of, and then follow step two.

2. Think of a Way to Confront the Fear

In other words, if it’s rollercoaster, maybe you do want to go on a rollercoaster ride. If it’s public speaker, maybe you want to give a presentation to just one person. I’m not going to encourage to do something so large and confrontational that it would make you freak out; decide what the appropriate level of discomfort is for you. Know that confronting fear can really provide you a lot of opportunity to grow and learn about yourself. Identify a step, small or large, to confront the fear and then move to step three.

3. Just Do It

Face the fear, see what happens. I was recently speaking with a group of folks, talking about the achievements that they had done recently that they were the most proud of, that they thought had the biggest impact. And we found some themes in all of the issues that people brought up as their proudest accomplishments. All of them started with fear.

If you start something that you know you can do and then you do it, you don’t have as big of a sense of accomplishment. But when there’s something that’s a little bit scary, something that provides an element of fear in your life, tackling it, confronting it, overcoming it will make you proud and make you confident.

I am curious what fears you have overcome and how the experience made you feel. Post a comment below.

Be Free!

Leah Simpson
Instructor

What Would You Do if You Weren
by On May 19, 2008

Leah SimpsonWhat would you do it you weren’t afraid? It’s such an interesting question. So many times, we’re held back by fear.

In fact, I was just looking up phobias. Do you know that there are 98 phobias of things that start with just the letter “S”? And this isn’t even an official website. There were probably many that were missed on this list but I’ll give you a couple of my favorite “S” phobias.

The fear of string – I believe it’s pronounced li-no-no-pho-bia.

The fear of slime – (Oh, by the way, the fear of slime has two names) – blennophobia or myxophobia, whichever your preference.

Where do these fears come from and more importantly, what would be do if weren’t afraid? Think about it. A fear holds you back from doing something. So where there is fear, there is opportunity.

I’ve heard two speakers recently, talk about fears that they had in their life and the way that they confronted them. They didn’t do it in a small way.

I heard one gentleman speaking about being afraid of roller coasters and so going and riding the same rollercoaster five times every summer until his fear was gone and now he loves it.

A good friend of mine was recently speaking and he was talking about of fear of losing control. He liked to be in control of everything so he decided to bungee jump, to do something proactive once a year that he was completely out of control.

Now, for everybody, having such a dramatic confrontation of their fear is not necessarily something that will happen. So I’m going to give you three steps to take advantage of the opportunity where you find fear.

1. Identify the Fear

When there’s something that you are wondering why you are not doing it, or there’s something that you’re curious about but you’re just not taking steps forward, most of the times it’s just a fear. Identify what the fear is, what are you afraid of, and then follow step two.

2. Think of a Way to Confront the Fear

In other words, if it’s rollercoaster, maybe you do want to go on a rollercoaster ride. If it’s public speaker, maybe you want to give a presentation to just one person. I’m not going to encourage to do something so large and confrontational that it would make you freak out; decide what the appropriate level of discomfort is for you. Know that confronting fear can really provide you a lot of opportunity to grow and learn about yourself. Identify a step, small or large, to confront the fear and then move to step three.

3. Just Do It

Face the fear, see what happens. I was recently speaking with a group of folks, talking about the achievements that they had done recently that they were the most proud of, that they thought had the biggest impact. And we found some themes in all of the issues that people brought up as their proudest accomplishments. All of them started with fear.

If you start something that you know you can do and then you do it, you don’t have as big of a sense of accomplishment. But when there’s something that’s a little bit scary, something that provides an element of fear in your life, tackling it, confronting it, overcoming it will make you proud and make you confident.

I am curious what fears you have overcome and how the experience made you feel. Post a comment below.

Be Free!

Leah Simpson
Instructor

Letting Go of Problems
by On May 16, 2008

I wrote about seeing problems as opportunities on the blog before. I wanted to progress with this thought by discussing the need to let go.Once you have accepted a problem as reality, and seen it as an opportunity to grow and change, the next step is to simply let it go.

To do this, you need to shift your focus to the solution and stop dwelling on the problem and the pain and the setback it’s caused. Remember, a problem only exists as long as you continue to make it one. There is a time to focus on what has happened in your life but then it is very important to learn the lesson and move on.

For example, say you don’t close that deal you’ve been working on. You really thought it would come thru but in the end, it didn’t. You may have needed that deal to help you get closer to your goals. You may begin to worry that you don’t have what it takes to really make it in your current form of employment.

If you stay stuck in thinking about what didn’t work, your focus lies on the problem. You keep thinking about what went wrong, so the next proposal is often muddied with these negating thoughts.

You start to feel pressure to close the next deal, because if you don’t close THAT one, now you’ll be reeeeeeeeeaally far off. That type of pressure will increase your stress and not allow you to perform at your highest level.

If a basketball player continues to focus on that last free throw he missed, his focus is not on the current task at hand. You need to bring ourselves into the present.

Ask yourself – What did I learn from that experience? What will I do differently next time? And then you must decide to move forward. See the opportunity for the future and put your focus on this new opportunity….not on the past.

Something I do when a job doesn’t go quite the way I had hoped is to picture that meeting or proposal as ribbons trailing behind me. Because whatever didn’t go well REALLY is behind me now. As I get into my car, I picture those ribbons being snipped off as I shut the door. As I drive away, I have left the ribbons there. I am NOT taking them with me to the next meeting or into the next day.

Reliving the past will not change it, but learning what you can improve in the future and then keeping that as the center of your focus, opens all sorts of doors for success today and tomorrow.

There are lots of variations of doing this visual release of your problems. Some people write down the problem, burn the paper and see the smoke (and problem) blow away.

Find whatever works for you but the most important thing is to find SOMEWAY to truly let it go.

Do you have a visual technique you use to let go of your problems? I would love to hear it. Post a comment below.

Be Free (of your problems)!!

Lauri Sompres